Cream Tea Scones

They may not be much to look at, but these scones are delicious, brushed with cream and sprinkled with coarse sugar. You can make however many you want and freeze what you don’t want to eat right away. Then heat them up in the oven or microwave and have hot scones that feel newly baked!



This is the first ever TED talk about Myalgic Encephalomyalitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. I cried when I watched it. What Jennifer Brea has to say about her experience is so important. We need people to pay attention to us, and to believe us. Doctors don’t treat or study what they dismiss. If you have ME/CFS, please send a link to this video to anyone you know who is interested in understanding you and your illness.

Here are the things I want:

  1. For doctors and scientists to recognize this disease. To acknowledge that it is real and provide palliative care even if they can’t do anything else.
  2. For governments and research organizations to allocate funding for research, which we so desperately need.
  3. For ordinary people to hear “ME/CFS” and understand that someone who has it is very sick. I don’t need them to know what it stands for, or what the symptoms are. All I want them to know is that it is real and it is serious. That seems like a very low bar to me.

In which I am once again stymied by two sticks and a piece of string

The first section of the hat using practice yarn (why yes, I am very cautious!)

Knitting! Is it some form of wizardry? You take a ball of yarn, add two needles, mess about with them and somehow end up with an article of clothing.

Thus far in my life, the only knitting projects I have completed have been scarves, but, putting fear behind me and venturing boldly into the unknown, I started working on a hat.

Unfortunately, while my stitches are very even, they are also on the tight side, so I may have to switch to bigger needles, as I doubt my ability to knit more loosely with any consistency.

As a novice, I find knitting instructions rather abstruse, but when I puzzle over them with my husband or look up videos online to show me how a given stitch is done, I can usually figure it out. It seems the main thing is to keep on trying. I have a goal to finish one knitting project this year, so . . . we’ll see how that goes.

Ode to a Baked Potato, on First Coming Out of the Oven

Your salted skin,

Thin, crisply brown,

Conceals within

A wealth of starch,

And butter is

Your golden crown.


Though lowly born,

O child of earth,

Your value is

A ransom’s worth

To one who knows

A famine’s dearth.


The light of sun

You do not know,

But heated by

An oven’s glow,

You bring us warmth

From lands below.

Goodbye, 2016

I had many goals for 2016, and I achieved a pleasing number of them, but my most resounding success may have been my reading goal: I set out to read 100 books I had never read before during the course of this year, and as of today I have read 102.

I read novels, biographies, plays, poetry, and comics. I read fantasies, mysteries, romances, histories, and a few children’s books. I read ancient classics and books published last year. Some of my favorites were Ivanhoe (knights!) by Sir Walter Scott, and Tooth and Claw (dragons!), by Jo Walton. I read books in every format: paperback, hardback, on my Kindle, on my phone. I listened to many audiobooks, some read by volunteers and others by professionals.

2016 was a good year for me in some ways, but I’m not sorry to move forward into 2017, where many more good reads await me, I’m sure. Happy New Year, everyone!